Book Review: Sita: Warrior of Mithila

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Title: Sita: Warrior of Mithila

Author: Amish Tripathi

Plot: India, 3400 BCE.

India is beset with divisions, resentment and poverty. The people hate their rulers. They despise their corrupt and selfish elite. Chaos is just one spark away. Outsiders exploit these divisions. Raavan, the demon king of Lanka, grows increasingly powerful, sinking his fangs deeper into the hapless Sapt Sindhu.

Two powerful tribes, the protectors of the divine land of India, decide that enough is enough. A saviour is needed. They begin their search.

An abandoned baby is found in a field. Protected by a vulture from a pack of murderous wolves. She is adopted by the ruler of Mithila, a powerless kingdom, ignored by all. Nobody believes this child will amount to much. But they are wrong.

For she is no ordinary girl. She is Sita.

Continue the epic journey with Amish’s latest: A thrilling adventure that chronicles the rise of an orphan, who became the prime minister. And then, a Goddess.

This is the second book in the Ram Chandra Series. A sequel that takes you back. Back before the beginning.

Thoughts:   I have read all of Amish Tripathi’s novels. He redefines mythological epics in a way that it interests the youth of today. I have waited ‘TWO YEARS’ for the release of this book and it’s finally here. It was a great opportunity to be present at a book store where the author visited for the promotion of this book. Sita: The Warrior of Mithila is the second installment in the Ramchandra series, Scion of Ikshvaku being the first one.

The book plot needs no introduction. It is inspired from the age old epic Ramayana revisited from Sita’s point of view, giving more power to her and celebrating her as a warrior rather than an obedient wife. The book highlights Sita’s life right from when she was rescued by Queen Sunaina to the time she was abducted by Raavan.

I love reading mythological tales narrated from a female point of view I simply loved the way Sita was portrayed in an unorthodox way. I have always imagined Sita as a damsel in distress until I read this novel where she has a warrior spirit and a will to bring India out of turmoil. The female characters of Queen Sunaina and Samichi are also portrayed as powerful women. The writing flows seamlessly and the manner is mesmerizing.

What makes this series interesting is firstly the fabrication of the epic in a way that it appeals to today’s generation and the fact that each book is narrated from a different point of view. The third book in this series will flow from Raavan’s point of view and I can’t wait to read it. I hope the author doesn’t make us wait this long again.

More power to Sita!!!

Ratings: 5/5

PS: I loved the cover!

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Book Review: The One

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Title:  The One (The Selection #3)

Author: Kiera Cass

Pages: 323 pages

Plot: The time has come for one winner to be crowned.

When she was chosen to compete in the Selection, America never dreamed she would find herself anywhere close to the crown—or to Prince Maxon’s heart. But as the end of the competition approaches, and the threats outside the palace walls grow more vicious, America realizes just how much she stands to lose—and how hard she’ll have to fight for the future she wants.

Favorite Quote: “Leave it to you to find beauty in something others would say ruins a day.”

This is the final (third book) in the Selection trilogy. You can read my reviews for The Selection here and for The Elite here. This book carries on the story right where the previous book ended. ‘The One’ embarks the growth in America’s character. She holds on to her beliefs and values even though she goofs up majorly. No mistakes made by her can overshadow the strength of her character. She shines through the book for the stand she takes. Maxon finally learns to trust. He lets down his guard, opens up like never before and starts sharing his thoughts and feelings. The development of America’s and Maxon’s characters was the highlight for me. Their relationship matures and deepens with passing time, and it becomes evidently visible that they are made for each other.

Rebels had been a part of the plot since the beginning. The earlier two books did mention the rebels, but this book throws a better insight at their purpose. The twist of the rebels makes the book interesting and breaks the monotony of the selection.

The flow of the story is quite unsurprising but as far as the series finale is concerned, I am quite content with the way things turn out in the end. I would defiantly recommend this book to those who have read the first two parts and are contemplating on reading the third one.

Ratings: 3.5/5

PS: I loved the covers of all the books. They were one of the reasons why I choose to read this series in the first place. 😉